Launching LMF - the Formal Methods Laboratory

The Laboratoire Méthodes Formelles (LMF) was founded on 1 January 2021 as a joint research centre of University Paris-Saclay, CNRS, ENS Paris-Saclay, Inria, and CentraleSupélec with a main focus on formal methods. The new laboratory combines the expertise of about 100 members from the former Laboratoire Spécification et Vérification (LSV) and the VALS team of Laboratoire de Recherche en Informatique (LRI).

In our mission to enlighten the digital world through Mathematical Logic, we rely on formal methods as a tool to analyse, model, and reason about computing systems, such as computer programs, security protocols, and hardware designs. Our research targets a wide range of computational paradigms, from classical to emerging ones such as biological and quantum computing.

LMF is structured around three hubs: Proofs and Models, which lie at the heart of our historical background, and Interactions, that is aimed at fostering cross-fertilisation between formal methods and other domains in computing science and beyond.

PhD Defence: Agustín Borgna

Towards a formal compilation stack-frame in quantum computing
by Agustín Borgna
Friday 13 January 2023 at 3pm
Loria, Nancy and online

Agustin Borgna

Abstract: The advent of quantum computers capable of solving problems that are intractable on classical computers has motivated the development of new programming languages and tools for quantum computing. However, the current state of the art in quantum programming is still in its infancy.

In this thesis, we present a series of novel approaches to different aspects of the quantum compilation process based on the ZX calculus. Read more...

The Frobenius Anatomy of Distributed Quantum Protocols

Speaker: Alexis Toumi, email: alexis@toumi.email

Tuesday, 10 January 2023, 14:00, Salle 1Z31

Abstract: Distributed consensus and leader election are two communication problems that quantum computers can solve in a deterministic way, while classical computers can only solve them probabilistically. These two quantum protocols can in fact be put in one-to-one correspondance with the GHZ and W states, the only two ways to entangle three qubits (up to LOCC, local operations and classical communication). In this talk, we will give an abstract formulation of quantum consensus and leader election in terms of spiders, also known as Frobenius algebras. In both cases, a single equation allows to create global entanglement from local interactions: spider fusion. We will conclude with some applications to quantum natural language processing (QNLP) where spiders allow to formalise the notion of anaphora and co-reference: we can compute a global meaning for text as the entanglement of local meanings for sentences.

Philippe Schnoebelen receives LICS 2022 Test-of-Time Award

Philippe Schnoebelen

Philippe Schnoebelen receives the LICS Test-of-Time Award 2022 for the article Temporal Logic with Forgettable Past co-authored with François Laroussinie (Université Paris-Cité) and Nicolas Markey (IRISA, CNRS). At the time of the writing of the article in 2002, the three authors were members of the same laboratory LSV which integrated the LMF in 2021.

The LICS - Logic in Computer Science conference is the most prestigious annual forum on theoretical and practical topics in computer science related to logic in a broad sense. The LICS Test-of-Time Award award recognizes a small number of papers from the LICS proceedings over the past 20 years (i.e., the paper in question dates from LICS 2002 and was considered this year) that have best stood the "test of time." In selecting these papers, the award committee considers the influence they have had since their publication; due to the fundamental nature of LICS work, the impact is often not felt immediately, hence the 20-year perspective.

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